The Curling News

I wrote a three-part series in Canada’s “The Curling News” documenting my experience while coaching curling in Shanghai, China in 2013-14.   About The Curling News THE CURLING NEWS is Canada’s first and only national curling newspaper and a world authority on the sport. Founded in Calgary in 1957 as Canadian Curling News, each modern-day issue of THE CURLING NEWS is packed with the latest analysis, behind-the-scenes stories, brilliant action photography, event and team previews, stunning design values and information you simply won’t find anywhere else. During our 50th anniversary publishing season, we opened the TCN archives and reprinted old stories and photos. Each one of our six monthly issues (November through April) continues a nod to curling’s glorious past while focusing on the top news in today’s game – including the drive to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games (and Paralympic Games) in Vancouver. THE CURLING NEWS boasts the best contributors in the sport today, going back through five decades of comprehensive curling coverage. There is even a monthly Curling TV Guide! Each issue is delivered in a protective polybag directly to your door, every month, via first-class...

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Why I’m neither a lover, nor a hater of CrossFit

By Robbie Gallaugher: An article written for www.clubawesome.ca discussing CrossFit.   It’s no secret that CrossFit has gained notable popularity in the fitness scene over recent years. It’s now difficult to go a day without being exposed to some mention of the fitness program whether it is on social media or in conversation. The success of it’s business model is impressive, and while many argue that it won’t last, there is no question in my mind that it will be around for at least the foreseeable future. As someone who holds a degree in exercise science I’ve always been curious as to what the CrossFit craze was all about. I would speak with friends who joined it and were addicted, and then I would turn around and speak with my colleagues who would bad mouth everything to do with it. I had formed my own opinion, but withheld writing about it because I had never gone in and experienced a CrossFit workout for myself. So a little over a week ago I signed up for a free intro workout, and after completing it my opinion has stayed the same; I’m neither a lover, nor a hater of CrossFit.   The Experience As I walked through the doors I viewed a bustling gym full of 20 and 30 somethings doing deadlifts and looking determined. I was greeted by the owner and given directions to the back change rooms. Slowly some more newbies arrived and as the preceding class cleared out, 8 of us gathered around to hear what the hour-long morning session had in store for us. We were told that our workout would consist of four sections; warm-up, mobility, metabolic conditioning and cool-down. We would be skipping the strength section and focusing on less-skilled movements since it was our first time. Our warm up involved us breaking up into two teams where were would compete in a relay race. The race was compiled of sprints, push-ups, air-squats and burpees. These were followed by partner piggybacks and sandbag carries in a non-race format. Teams then had to perform a bonus set of an exercise (burpees or push-ups) depending on whether they had won or lost. Our mobility section mainly focused on the hips by slowly...

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Why forcing your kids to do push-ups is making them fat

By Robbie Gallaugher: An article written for Club Awesome discussing the topic of youth fitness.   Youth fitness training is a controversial topic with people positioned strongly for and against it. Some feel youth should focus on non-structured play while others feel their children will be missing out if they don’t participate in organized sport or fitness training. While there are strong arguments on both sides, let’s take a look from a scientific perspective at what you need to consider before making the decision about your kids involvement in physical activity.   Cardiovascular Training   Most activity that produces increased cardiovascular output is completely safe for youth. This is because our heart and lungs grow in proportion to our stature, thus making them completely equipped to meet the demands of physical activity. If you watch children play naturally on a playground you will notice that their play is characterized by bursts of moderate to vigorous activity, which is somewhat similar to interval training that some adults do. Just because a child does not perform a prolonged cardiovascular activity does not mean they are inactive or unfit. Note that children also have a higher breathing frequency than adults do, so it is normal for them to breathe rapidly during activity and should not be a cause for concern. They are also very good at self-regulating when they need to slow down or stop for rest.   Strength Training   Unlike our heart and lungs, our muscles and bones do not grow in proportion to our stature. This raises the need for caution when approaching strength training activities. We’ve all seen those lanky kids whose arms hang down to their ankles or feet look 5 sizes too big. Although they may be tall and appear strong, their un-proportioned bodies actually make coordination and strength more difficult. It’s similar to holding onto the end of a ruler and placing an eraser on it. The further away you place the eraser from your hand the more difficult it becomes to hold. Another concern when strength training is the underdeveloped bone density of youth. Their bones are still growing and are not as strong which makes them more susceptible to breaking. Now although breaking a bone isn’t anything to worry...

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Newsletter design & copywriting

I designed and wrote copy for Curl BC’s monthly newsletters from April 2008 – July 2012. These newsletters were designed in Adobe InDesign and included text, photos, corporate advertisements and graphics. I also used online software to design and distribute the Marpole Curling Club’s newsletters from August – December 2012. Tools such as MailChimp, Google Analytics and Bitly were used to distribute, promote, track and analyze these digital media initiatives for audiences up to 40,000+...

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Website management

Over the years I have been responsible for maintaining the following websites. While others deserve credit for the initial design creation of these websites, I have taken these WordPress themes and customized them with my communication, design and web skills to suit the needs of the businesses & organizations they were intended...

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Curl BC Yearbooks 2009-2012

I created the Curl BC Yearbook for the 2010/11, 2011/12 & 2012/13 seasons. This annual publication was approximately 120 pages and included graphics, photos, text and advertisements. 10,000 copies were printed each year and distributed across British Columbia. I used Adobe InDesign to design the...

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Curl BC Media Releases

I wrote all media releases for Curl BC from November 2009 – July...

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Leveraging life goals to support curling

By Robbie Gallaugher – I can still remember sitting in the Curl BC Board Meeting on September 25, 2010; listening and watching as a motion was moved and passed to establish the Curl BC Curling for Life Endowment Fund. I knew right then and there, history was in the making. Like many of us, I grew up in a curling family. I spent most of my childhood winter weekends at the curling clubs up and down Vancouver Island watching my father compete or curling myself; and can even remember playing in the daycare room at the Duncan Curling Club on Tuesday mornings while my mother played in her women’s league. Curling is in my blood. It’s been a part of my life for as long as I can remember and will continue to be a part of my life for as far as I can foresee. I’ve been fortunate enough to be involved in the game as both a junior & adult curler, in both recreational and competitive play. I’ve also been a volunteer, a staff person and a fan. I’ve travelled to more small towns across BC than any of my friends can imagine; and had the opportunities to travel as far north as Whitehorse, Yukon, and as far east as Stephenville, Newfoundland. I even moved cities one year just so I could curl with a particular team. I’ve met more people and made more friends through the sport of curling than I even dare to count. I’ve interacted, become close, shared ups and downs, and created memories with people of numerous ages, demographics and personalities. I’ve even been lucky enough to be one of very few people who can say they’ve competed in a national championship with their father and sister. The fact is, that if I had to delete every curling experience, and every experience that resulted from an interaction or opportunity that originated from curling, I would have very few things left in my life. Sure, I probably would have filled my time with other opportunities, but the reality is that my life would be completely different. Curling has provided me with an incredible amount of positive experiences and memories. Behind these opportunities and experiences, there are many significant foundations that...

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Sport & recreation should be included on political platforms (Op Ed)

By Robbie Gallaugher – Government support of sport and physical activity is an important topic when electing Canada’s federal, provincial and municipal political leaders. Given the impact that sport and physical activity have on the quality of life in local communities across the country, this should be a meaningful topic for politicians to include and discuss on their platforms. 18% of Canadians belong to a sport group in some capacity, and 39% take part in over 250,000 sport events in Canada every year. With over 33,000 sport organizations, and 5.3 million sport and recreation volunteers (more than any other sector) there is no question that there is a well-deserved place for sport in Canadian political discussions. When looking at the benefits of sport, its direct positive impact on physical, mental and psycho-social well-being are obvious, but equally meaningful are its links to decreased crime and healthcare costs. Sport programs have been shown to help youth develop pro-social behaviour, which reduces instances of vandalism and underage drinking. This is backed by 92% of Canadians who believe that community sport can have a positive influence in the lives of youth. Research estimates that direct healthcare costs due to physical inactivity range between $2.1 and $5.3 billion per year. Sport and physical activity can and should be considered preventative healthcare services that are just as, if not more, important than curative healthcare. Healthcare, crime and quality of living are common topics on political platforms. It is vital that politicians engage citizens in improving these areas through sport and physical activity; as they are together the most popular single sector with the widest range of positive effects that can do this. Political discussion should be initiated and maintained regarding investments in sport and recreational infrastructure and programming; that are accessible to all Canadians no matter their ability, income, age or...

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